Posts Tagged ‘arab spring’

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It’s Not Your Business If We Kiss His Ass

January 12, 2012

In Egypt and Sudan female circumcision is still widely practised, in Tibet they still cut in pieces the death and throw them to the birds, in east Africa some tribes slice their phallus, in India they still burn widows alive, and in Kuwait men shake noses instead of shaking hands… Yet, no one finds it chocking and everyone says ‘’it’s cultural!’’ to stay politically correct! But when it comes to some Moroccan stupid old fashion general kissing the hand of the crowned prince, no one thinks it’s cultural and many Arabs start criticizing Moroccan internal affairs!

If I’ll meet the crowned prince Moulay El Hassan or even his father Mohamed VI, I don’t think I will kiss their hands, because I only postern to God who created me, but no one will cut my head or put me in prison for that! What other Arabs don’t understand or refuse to admit is that we are different and we have different traditions and histories, even if they cross so often. Therefore, it’s no one’s business what we do with our 12 centuries monarchy, and if some traditional or old school servants of the throne still want to show their allegiance to the royal family by kissing their hands, because they think it’s the way to show respect to the offsprings of prophet Mohamed, it’s up to us to judge them and not to you!

We have a proverb in Morocco that says ‘’wait until you have crossed the river and dried your feet to give advices’’. I will say the same proverb for my Arab readers, who just got out of their revolution and who still have wet feet in the mud of years and years of oppression, but who already became specialists in Arab world’s politics and start giving advices and exporting their experiences to countries which live in an entirely different context. Some of these people come from countries that didn’t exist on the map 50 years ago, others from places where my father is older than their monarchies, and most from countries to which Nasser exported his military socialist model 60 years ago. No need to say that it’s Nasser’s legacy hires who the people are revolting against today in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Tunisia etc because apparently the citizens of these countries realised that they prefer a civilian liberal rule rather than a pan-Arabist military one.

Now let’s take the Moroccan example. While Nasser and his clan were mocking our monarchy 60 years ago, we chose another path, a path of gradual democratic transitions, a liberal economy, structural adjustments, strategic partnerships with the West, and a reconciliation process which started long enough to start giving its fruits. Yes Hassan II was a hard father on us. Yes you can call him a dictator in regards to certain decisions he took. But, that clever king saved us historically from 60 years of ‘’ideological adolescence’’ if we had taken the Nasser path like everyone else in the region. And now in less than 15 years we had voted for a leftist government, a right wing government and now we are trying the Islamist model, all without any complex and in a mature transitional democratic process that we are internally very critical about!

I don’t pretend my country is perfect. I know better than anyone that it has its strengths and weaknesses. We have a young movement which is militating for constitutional and economic reforms called the 20th of February, which recently made things advance to the better and created a fresh dynamism in the relations between the castle and the elites. However, I don’t tolerate lesson givers who know nothing about our culture, politics and traditions except from Samira Said and the footballer Hadji, and I have one thing to tell them ‘’None of your business if we want to kiss our monarchy’s hands or asses!’’.

P.S: the video everyone is talking about http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZ2pn8_XT2M

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منبت الأحرار، مشرق الأنوار”: رسالة شابة إلى ملكها”

January 3, 2012

 

ملكي العزيز محمد السادس،

أما بعد،

منبت الأحرار، مشرق الأنوار“، هكذا قيل لنا عن وطننا الحبيب المغرب ونحن أطفال. أنا لست من الحمر الباحثين من الربيع في فبراير، ولا من ذوي العمامات الخضر الذين يحجون إلى قبة البرلمان في محرم. أنا الثلاثون مليون الذين يعشقون بلد يتماها فيه الأحمر والأخضر في علم واحد. أنا جيل ولد في السنوات العجاف، سنوات الرصاص والجفاف وإعادة الهيكلة القحطاء الذي يرنو لنسيانها في ربيع يزهر في ظل حكمك.

“بالروح، بالجسد، هب فتاك، لبى نداك” من شباب لا يرضى أن يكون مجرد رقم في مؤشرات التنمية البشرية. أنا شاب لا آبه بقشور الحياة من توظيف مباشر في مسالك الدولة، أو بتطبيب مترف في أحد مستشفياتها، ولا حتى بسكن كريم في مدنها الجديدة. قد أكون قد تماديت في رفع الكلفة بيني وبين جلالتك. أعذر طمعي في عطفك، وقد رأيت من طلقهن الشعب من جنان السياسة قد قصدن بلاطك كحواريين. كيف لا وقد اعتاد الأنذال دق باب الأشراف بحثا عن خرقة تستر عورتهم الوجودية. وكيف لا تنصفني أيها الشريف أنا شعبك وقد قصدتك طالبا القصاص منهم . أنا “في فمي وفي دمي ثار نور ونار” سعيا وراء حقي الدستوري الوحيد الذي لست مستعدا للتخلي عنه: الكرامة.

ملكي، “هيا للعلى سعيا”ǃ لقد دقت درعا بالألاعيب السياسية الخارقة، والنخب المارقة، والصحافة المسيئة، والأحزاب الرديئة. قد أكون أخرقا حينا وعاطفيا أحيانا، لكن “ذكرى كل لسان” لست أنا من خان أباك الذي كان يسير بيني في الأسواق، ولن أخونك أنت الذي ينحني لأراملي ويقبل مشلولي. بل هي الضباع التي استأسدت في عهدك والتي تحوم حول صولجانك مدعية الشباب الأبدي التي من شأنها أن تعض يدا جادت عليها يوما.

نحن شباب نريد أن نمضي بين الشعوب رافعين رؤوسنا نشهد الدنيا، أن هنا نحيا بشعار: الله، الوطن، الملك”.

“عشت في الأوطان، للعلى عنوان”.

شابة مغربية

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The Farmer, The Warrior, The Merchant, The Lazy, & The Whore

August 23, 2011

In another life when I was studying at Al Akhawayn University I had an international relations professor called Dr. Kalpakian who told us once this: ‘’there was once a father who had 4 sons, the elder became a farmer and moved to Morocco, the second became a warrior and settled in Algeria, the third became a merchant and went to Tunisia, and the last one was so lazy that he remained at his father’s house in Libya’’. I remembered this tale now that we are living the time of harvests of the Arab Spring and would like to revisit each brother to see how they’ve been doing!

The Farmer: The farmer spent 12 centuries building his feudal kingdom, alternating periods of oppression and prosperity. Yet, despite the strange rituals he has been imposing on his people like kissing his hand, declaring himself holy by the constitution, or his mania of collecting human snakes, the farmer did a great job in the poor kingdom of Morocco. He inaugurated infrastructures, readjusted the structure of the economy and made the country a small paradise visited by 10 million tourists per year. In addition the Farmer built strong ties with the kingdom of Europa and is trying to reconcile between modernity and tradition which makes the citizens of Morocco looks schizophrenics most of the time!

The Warrior: The Warrior brother was so strong and brave in his youth that he liberated Marseille during WWII and sacrificed 1million martyr during the independence of Algeria from France. But once all great wars ended he found himself with a huge army without a job to do, so he started unnecessary civil war, a war with his brother the farmer and ever a war with Egypt about football! The people of the warrior brother will rise one day against social injustice and will condemn the generals who are stealing the country’s wealth; it’s just not their time yet!

The Merchant: He is the most charismatic of the four brothers. He can sell anything to anyone at any price! He lives in a country which is very open to foreigners and new tendencies and where women enjoy a great deal of freedom. One day a big dragon came to their land and cut the heads of women wearing Hijab and the tongues of men expression their anger, but the Merchant didn’t react because he was wise enough to wait until his offspring are well educated and until the house he was building is strong enough to resist the dragon. One day the brother realised that the dragon was allergic to Jasmines, so he planted so many that the dragon who hated religion escaped to the most religious country in the world!

The Lazy: The lazy brother was feeling misunderstood. It’s not that he is idle; it’s just that he enjoys more the simplicity of Bedouin life under a million stars in the big Sahara desert. One day a Jewish clown came to Libya and convinced its inhabitants to wear green sunglasses to the point that they started seeing everything around them green whereas in reality it was deserted and arid. Inspired by his merchant brother, the lazy decided to fight the evil clown and to die for the land of his ancestors and to clean Libya Zanga Zanga from the green glasses effect. Now on the Lazy deserves to have another name: The Brave!

The Whore: In fact the four brothers had a sister too which they chose to forget about because she was so rebellious. The sister was so charming and beautiful, with her pyramidal humps and her longue generous hair flowing like the Nile River. The sister was so adventurous during her youth that she decided to escape to Egypt and get enrolled in the Army. However, the poor girl didn’t seem to understand what happens to innocent girls in the army! She was raped and imprisoned for 58 years, and worse of all she was prostituted to her Eastern neighbour by the ruling generals to the extent that everyone forgot her real name ‘’Oum Eduniya’’ and started calling her The Whore. Despite her harsh condition the whore managed to fall in love with a Tunisian man who covered her naked body with Jasmine flowers, and so she gave birth secretly to a blessed baby: The Revolution. Unfortunately, we heard that the army generals are looking for the whore’s baby to slaughter him at birth and kill any hope of change!

I think it’s high time for a family reunion for the four brothers and their sister to support each other and learn from their experiences and why not live together in the same big house again!

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I am an X%

July 2, 2011

la Croix.org copyrights

I was never good in mathematics, but when it’s political mathematics I don’t mind trying. So 98,5% of Moroccans voted YES, only 1,51% voted NO, 73% participated, and the other 27% probably boycotted the Referendum, went shopping during the sales at Zara, went bronzing in Dar Bouazza, or are part of the confused X% to which I belong!

What Does It Mean To Be An X%? Well it simply means that you have a monarchist 19 years brother who voted YES, a nationalist father who call you at 8 a.m from Rabat to Alexandria to remind you to go do your national duty of voting, a politically passive aunt who never had any political position but who suddenly decided to vote YES not to let Feb20 movement decide for her, and hundreds of friends in real and virtual life who find every royal discourse holy and every royal gesture so CUTE and worth sharing on social networks. It also means that you have journalist friends whom you trust saying NO, activists you believe in deciding to boycott the vote, and other hundreds of friends who demonstrate in the streets every Sunday since the 20th of February. If you are like me you were feeling torn between the YES and the NO and finally decided not to vote on the first of July, because you prefer letting mathematics being the referee between the YES and the NO!

The Masses Said YES! And the biggest mistake is to think that the masses are not mature enough to decide for themselves. It doesn’t mean that if they were not present on twitter and facebook like you, that they don’t have a voice and an opinion about their country. Also, please stop saying that we are an illiterate country and most didn’t even read the project of the constitution, because this will be underestimating the intelligence of your fellow Moroccans educated and illetrate together, who don’t need to have a degree in constitutional law to know that it is about the redefinition of the three pillars of the Moroccan modern state: Allah (Religion), Al Watan (Territory), Al Malik (Monarchy). Furthermore, this 98,5% shows how much the new Moroccan ‘‘elites’’ are isolated in their virtual world and closed circles of people who look exactly like themselves, to the extent that they really believed for a second that the Moroccan masses will revolt, and this referendum is a reality chock which we should not take with the classical reaction of refusal, but with the maturity of reconsidering our choices and stop talking and media, social media and bars and start listening to the beat of the deep society!

The Cheap Makhzen Propaganda! The fact that I support the decision of the Moroccan people whatever it is, doesn’t mean I support the archaic way the Makhzen managed this referendum. For the NOz all people saying yes were corrupted and manipulated and for the YESz all people saying no are traitors and foreign spies, and these Manichean campaigns went on as July first was approaching. Yet, the Makhzen over abused its mobilisation tools and made us feel that the soul of Idriss el Bassri was there somewhere directing all this, with all the Mkadems, Kayeds, Consular Affairs, Police Forces… ‘’encouraging’’ the people to vote YES. Then you have the eternal magical religious card, with the Sufi brotherhoods hitting the streets and praying the whole night for the Monarchy, and the Imams at the Friday prayers preaching in favour of the constitution. Then comes our almighty king going to vote in his fabulous Djellaba, reminding us of his religious authority and that it’s not time for the modernity of suites and ties in our traditional kingdom of Morocco. All I can say is: Halleluiah and Bravo for the big communication hit!

Back To The Constitution Itself: Personally I don’t think that the constitution was that bad, but we could have done better. First, when you read it you feel that it is a Very Moroccan constitution, written by Moroccans in response to current changes, and has nothing to do with the copy-pasted constitutions we used to have from the French ones. A second positive aspect is that the text constitutionalised all the assets and gains of the past 10 years: women rights, the rights of Moroccans Resident Abroad, human rights, prevalence of international laws over national laws, Advanced Regionalization, Human Development etc. But my personal 5 favourite articles, remains: 1. Unconditional Freedom of Expression, 2. Access to State Information, 3. Communication Privacy Rights, 4. No more Detentions, Tortures or Invasion of homes, 5. Youth Inclusion and Participation as constitutional rights.  So yes the king didn’t give up of much of his military, political or religious powers, but whom do you trust in Morocco to give them to? And imagine with me one moment what we can do with my favourite 5 articles?

So I would like to thank the Moroccan People illiterates and educated for making the choice on behalf of us poor confused X%, to thank the Constitutional Committee who were clever enough not to bother the king and at the same time gave us space to militate from within the system, and to thank Feb20 movement for spicing up the political debate. From my side, if I have to live with this constitution, I promise to abuse every single constitutional right I have, starting with Freedom of Expression!