Posts Tagged ‘revolution’

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Horror on the Desert Road

November 14, 2013

‘’Nawarty Masr’’ said the driver, holding my name in a piece of paper and waiting for me at terminal 3 of Cairo airport. He probably thought that I am a tourist coming from Casablanca and excited to discover the wonders of the land of the pharaohs. ‘’is it your first time in Egypt?’’ he asked me while putting the baby’s stroller on the back of the agency’s Hyundai. ‘’I lived in Egypt for 4 years now’’ I replied tiredly as I wanted to put an end to the conversation since I just had a hell of a 5 hours flight with a sick 5 months baby who didn’t stop vomiting on me. At that moment I didn’t suspect that the real horror was still waiting for me on the road.

Finally, I was in a car holding my sleeping baby and relaxing, while thinking of nothing but a hot bath and a comfortable bed after a fruitful mission in my home country: Morocco. After one hour stuck in Cairo’s famous jam, Hussein the driver said desperately looking for some kind of conversation to kill the time ‘’who did you vote for Madame?’’, ‘’I am not Egyptian, I don’t vote, and you who did you vote for’’ I replied carelessly just not to ignore him. ‘’I voted for Mursi as he is the best among the worse’’.

I was half asleep, at 00:30h 5 kilometres before the gates of Alexandria, when all of a sudden a light blue Chevrolet Optra with no car plates came out of nowhere of the you-turn and tried to hit our car. In the beginning, I didn’t realise what was happening to us and thought it must be some drunk young men heading to the north coast. Then the car hit us again and came right in front of us and stopped suddenly. We went straight into the strange car, and the sock woke up the baby and made the driver shout loudly ‘’Thugs! Thug!’’. The brave Hussein, drove the car with all its speed backward and made some Hollywoodian manipulation and went towards two trucks which were on the Cairo – Alex desert road. Meanwhile, our aggressors didn’t give up, seeing that there was only the driver and I in the Hyundai. They came on our right and started hitting us again trying to get us outside the main road. At that moment, my eyes crossed the eyes of the Optra’s driver. Cold evil eyes of a dark skin man who has many scars on his face as a witness of a criminal past. He was holding a firearm and knocking on his ride’s window asking us to poll out of the road and stop. Seeing the gun and the scary faces of the two ‘’Baltagiya’’ on that Chevrolet, I had the reaction of holding tight my baby and getting down under the seats, as the first thing that came to my mind was the possibility that they might start shooting our tires if we don’t stop.

I don’t know how many minutes I spent under that seat, but for me time was frozen, and I was looking at my baby and thinking: what if they shoot him? What if they rape me? I started trying to remember the valuable things I have in my luggage to offer them in order to convince them not to kill us. I thought of my friend Karim who got stopped on this same road by thugs who stole all his goods, his car, and even the coins of money on his pocket. Yet, I am not Karim, I am a woman with a baby, and when it happens to someone else no matter how close he is it’s not the same when it happens to you. I also remembered when I was in Rio with my friend Majd, when a men holding a M16 raised on the highway and started shooting, and how our driver laughed at us and said ‘’ it’s normal! welcome to Brazil!’’ while deviating him with his bullet proof taxi. 

Hussein’s voice interrupted my scared thoughts when I heard him saying ‘’you can come up Madame, I can see Alexandria’s gates’’, as if Alexandria’s gates were the doors of paradise where the deliverance from our nightmare was waiting for us. I was still under chock and the tears fiercely came down my frightened pale face. Hussein, him was shouting ‘’we deserve El Adly, I regret voting for Mursi. I should have voted for Shafik! This f…… country needs security!’’.

At Alexandria’s gates, we stopped at the police checkpoint and told the officer about the description of the car and what happened to us hoping that they will send a patrol to get the Baltagiya. In the contrary, the officer stared at us and said carelessly ‘’this happens often. We know these thugs. It’s normal’’ I prefer abstaining from saying what I think of that officer because the problem is way bigger than what happened to me, and I chose to tell the story as it happened without side comments or analysis, because it doesn’t need any.

We headed to Alexandria where our loved ones were waiting for us to get back safe. We didn’t pay attention that we left the radio on during the entire incident, where a nationalistic song was singing ‘’you are the dear Oh my country! And you are the most beautiful Oh my country! If things get bad, we will fix them, and if things get wrong, we will sing for you. Oh my country! Oh my country!’’.

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They Masturbated Egypt!

November 24, 2011

If you think I am too vulgar, too bold or too choking, you can blame it on my 8 months pregnancy hormones if it can make you digest better what I have to say. That been said, let me tell you how much the system in Egypt thinks you are cheap with your dreams of change, to the extent that they deprived you from a real revolutionary orgasm after January 25th revolution, and preferred to gently masturbate your 58 years of military frustrations and propaganda by giving you fake fantasies of a glorious Egypt, while nothing has changed for the past 9 months.

Too Good to be True

“Too good to be true”, that’s the only relevent expression I can use to describe what happened in Tahrir Square in January 2011. We’ve seen civilised people chanting, peaceful demonstrations, supportive international community, and in less than a week a dictator, who ruled for more than 30 years, collapsed!

When you have been ruled since the 50s by a military regime, when you are neighbour with Israel, Sudan and Saudi Arabia, and when you have the Suez Canal and a frank Mediterranean coast facing Europe, don’t expect to change a complicated context in 18 days of camping in a square and tweeting to the world your rage. With my due respect to the more than 300 martyrs and all the honest youth, but they would have never let you do that and the proof is the brutal confrontations we are having with the police since the 19th of November as if nothing changed!

I was doing a fellowship two months ago, and had the change to meet the great Egyptian Dr. Makeen Makeen, who is a senior lecturer at SOAS, London. He explained how Egypt missed a historical momentum in Jan25 by not choosing to build a proper democracy according to the three famous post-conflict democratic models: the Japanese model which consists in turning the page and starting anew; the Hungarian model which led step by step reforms, and the South African model based on truth investigation and national reconciliation, which is the most relevent one for the Egyptian case. Instead, the SCAF in its quick masturbatory efforts chose to ignore all democracy models and to go for an Egyptocracy based on an improvised referendum and a cinematographic trial of Mubarak and company!

Walk like an Egyptian, Pee like an Egyptian

How nice and symbolic were all the pictures and the underground songs produced during the revolution… Yet, how over used and abused they were in feeding the nationalistice ego and keep the standards Egyptian busy while the regime was stealing his revolution! And don’t you think we also over abused the meaning of demonstrations to the extent it became a national sport or a friday carnival where friends hang out together, concerts are being held and promotional products being sold. I don’t say that Egyptians don’t have the right to celebrate, but let’s be very careful of not banalising non-violent protests, because it will mean that we started masturbating ourselves without the help of the regime.

In one of his note Adil Abel Wahab a theatre director from Alexadria described how Tahrir was a perfect theatre scene where everyone was just acting in front of live broadcasting international cameras. According to him the chanting, the trash collecting, the peaceful coexistence were all “Ethics of Tahrir” which we leave behind us once we leave the square and stop playing the role of the educated responsible citizens. After the nice scenes the world saw on TV, we still don’t clean in front of our own houses, the administration is still corrupted, the traffic still messy, the sexual harassment the same… So can you tell me what did we revolt against? Another shameful action was when Israel killed Egyptian soldiers on the borders. The normal attitude would have been the Sharaf’s government cutting economic and diplomatic ties with this country like what Turkey did and full stop. However, we preferred being uncivilised and creating a false icon of a flying men who stole a piece of cloth and young men sick enough to pee collectively on the wall of a historical building.

The Islamist and the Stripper

We all agree that one of the main winners of Jan25 was the islamist movements, whether the Muslim brotherhood or the Salafis, who jumped into the political scene and the neighbourhoods to mark their territories more sharply and openly than before, helped in that by their years of field experience and the balkanisation of the political scene in Egypt. During the last Eid El Adha it was so obvious that on the field the country was devived between the two main Islamist trends which control the allegiance of the masses with a religious stick. I have seen them building massive tents, organising huge charity events and even stopping you from parking your car in front of your house just “because they said so”!

Few days later, the country’s online community woke up horrified by the images of Alae Al Mahdi, a young wanna-be adolescent who published her naked pictures in a blog in order to defy patriarchal norms. This dicholomy shows one thing: there is a huge gap between virtual Egypt and Real Egypt. One is ruled my moustaches, and the other by liberal taboo-defying youth.

Now you can tell me it’s not your business, you are not even Egyptian or shut up and leave, but I may be Moroccan yet I carry an Egyptian citizen in my belly and I care very much about the country to whom he belongs which is my home too. I go every day carrying him inside of me to the demonstrations looking for hope for a better future in the tears of the blinded eyes by tear gas, in the blood of the youth who carelessly confront mighty police forces, in the smiles of the volunteer doctors, and in the phone calls of the worried parents. As a parent, I believe in the reloaded revolution, and would like my son to have more options than 50 more years of military masturbatory rule, or an islamist rule in which it will maybe Haram for lady Egypt to have a proper revolutionary orgasm!

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Confessions of Ali, a Revolutionary Opportunist

May 27, 2011

Revolutions are made of some few idealistic, committed and honest people and thousands of opportunists who go with the crowd, seize the moment and mobilize a noble fight for their personal sick materialistic or psychological interests. These specimens are often misunderstood and hiding their intentions in the shadows of their dark minds. I will be enjoying today doing the autopsy of Ali, a revolutionary opportunist from the Arab World.

Profile: I am not too tall, not too short, not too handsome, not too ugly, an average guy from an average family, who was average in my studies, my personal life and in my career. I always felt misunderstood and gifted in a way that I cannot explain. Sometimes I feel like killing or making suffer these people who have better girl friends, better cars and better job positions, but I can’t because I am too coward, so I spend my time stabbing them on their backs and gossiping about how life can be unjust with an average citizen like me.

Motivation: Revolutionary winds are shifting powers in the Middle East, this is maybe my chance to shine and become a star. I have no principals except my Marlboro Light and my daily Beer at the bar with my friends over a good Barca match. Ideology? Are you kidding me ? the best ideology is to be against EVERYONE, and EVERYTHING, ALL THE TIME. It makes me look intellectual and critical in front of innocent girls I want to flirt with during the debates I have in the coffee shop.

Why I do this? Well I find it not fair that Youssef has a BMW where I only have a Renault. I hate the fact that I only get 1000euro per month whereas Asmae gets 5000, and why the hell does amine get to party every night when I just can afford going out twice a week? See how unjust is my country and my society? Yeah and all that health, education and poverty stuff the media talks about!

To say the truth, I was always dreaming about being in some kind of opposition of some kind of issue and being interviewed by some kind of media and telling them some kind of lies that the masses love to hear. Nothing can flatter my ego like receiving admiring phone calls and praising comments on my facebook wall, and maybe even meeting some of that open-minded girls who participate in demonstrations. I heard that they are very flexible about sexual intercourses! That’s what I call a revolution man! And at the end of all this mess I may become a parliamentary member for the party of lemons and bananas or even a minister of Islamic Affairs! God bless the revolution!

Steps to follow: it’s all easy, I have to grow up my hair and my beard, wear a shirt with the face of Che Guevara, a purple Palestinian Kofeya  and go everyday to the bars and coffee shops where the pseudo-intellectuals gather, until they all become my friends, so I start telling them fake adventures about the day I was beaten by the police and the day I did a hunger strike at the ministry of interior. Next step is to create a blog where I insult the king, the army, the police, the media, God and even my mother if it can be useful, without forgetting to update my twitter and facebook account with news and articles and sharing revolutionary statements like: ‘’I will die for my country’’, ‘’we will not fall until the regime falls’’, ‘’with our resistance we will break the chains of injustice’’…

In action: I am not interested in spending the night at the square or in front of the parliament because I cherish too much my body for that, but I convince my band of revolutionaries that I spend the night doing grater missions lobbying for our cause (with my play station) and protecting my neighbourhood from thieves (while sleeping 12 hours every night on a cosy bed). My favourite moments are when I take the microphone at the demonstrations and exteriorise all my frustration. I truly get my inspiration and anger from the memory of Youssef stealing my lollypop at first grade. That traumatised me for the rest of my life. I also enjoy speaking to lost foreign media reporters I meet in the square, to whom I introduce myself as the leader of the leaders of the revolution and an expert of social media and political analyst and journalist and human rights activists and representative of the cats and dogs initiative for the freedom of donkeys and ponies. I always explain to them ‘’how much the situation is complicated and the inequality is prevailing and that the youth of this country are ready to die for liberation because all of them have lost their lollypops with a tyrant dictator’’.

Look around you and tell me how many of Ali you can see in your direct surroundings nowadays. How many people just became revolutionaries just two days ago, without cleaning the street, educating their children on democratic ideals, helping the poor, planting a rose or spreading hope? Remember that Kaddafi, Mubarak, Ali Abdallah Saleh or Ben Ali were all of them one day revolutionary opportunists like my Ali!

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What if the US invades Libya?

March 12, 2011

Who would have thought that a country like Libya who was a geopolitical Terra Nullius for the past 40 years, would become at the very centre of international debates and strategies? Libya is a very ancient civilization which enjoys a strategic position in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, rich with its generous oil reserves. Yet, Kaddafi erased Libya from the maps since 1969 with two decades of isolation, embargo, dictatorship, absence from the Union from the Mediterranean, and caricatural political positions.

If we learnt something since January from the Arab turmoil, it would be that no matter how logical and accurate you keep your analysis it cannot be applied to the Arab world, and I am using the constructed term ‘’the Arab World’’ consciously because I believe in the rise of a neo-panarabism in the region. So if we follow the illogical and unexpected series of events, we can imagine everything including a US invasion of Libya: ‘’Surprise! Surprise!’’

People familiar with international relations would understand that severe violations of human rights and crime against humanity can justify interference in the internal issues of a sovereign country according to the UN doctrine, and Mr. Kaddafy who is raiding and bombarding massively his population in front of international cameras has given all justifications for a military invasion of Tripoli. And any person, who was following the events during the past 10 years, would deduce that it took less than that for the US to invade Iraq and Afghanistan! But we all know that no country will engage in warfare out of charity and compassion, unless it has some interests to defend, and the US real-politics machine seems to have several interests in Kaddafiland:

– Saharian Africa and Al Qaida of the Islamic Maghreb: With the conflicts in Sudan which the US is having a hard time controlling with the presence of the French in the Tchad-Darfur situation and the Chinese domination over the economy and the oil companies, and with the annoying presence of Al Qaida of the Islamic Maghreb in Saharian Africa, the US will have a on-field control over the situation if it get stationed in Libya which is well in the centre of all this, and maybe the King of Kings of Africa Muamar Kaddafi will leave his throne to the Afro-American King Mr. Obama.

– The Mediterranean: We have the feeling since the end of the Cold War that more or less the European Union is a solo player in the Mediterranean with its neighbourhood policy and newly born Union for the Mediterranean. We don’t need to mention how important is the Mediterranean for international trade, NATO, migration flows, and intercultural dialogue, so we can imagine easily the US wanting a share of the tomatoes, cheese and olive oil Quiche.

– Mashrek and Maghreb: The US has already a hand in Iraq at the eastern edge of the Middle East, and had strong allies in North Africa in the person of the falling dictatorships, so no wonders that in a situation where it would be very problematic to control Egypt directly because of the high political awareness of the populations and the high pressure of international media and Arab lobbies in the west, it would be wiser to target a country which is next door but which has a less significant emotional importance for the rest of the Arab public opinion. If the US invades Libya, it will have eyes and hands East and West and would protect the interests of Israel more closely.

– The Oil benefits: Libya has one of the biggest reserves of oil in the world. Unfortunately its incomes were scattered around following Kaddafi’s fantasies without benefiting directly to the Libyan people. Without focusing too much on the oil factor, it remains an important argument if the US plans any attacks.

As a counter-argument we can mention that the Obama administration is a hardcore Republican, and is too clever to commit such a mistake. We have witnessed that contrarily to Democrats, the Obama regime is more focused on internal issues and giving more weight to intelligence and alternative diplomacy in terms of its foreign policy, rather than military intervention which was the biggest shame of the Bush cabinet. However, 2011 is the year of all surprises and everything remains possible!

If a US invasion to Libya becomes a reality, Kaddafi would have done to the Libyan citizens what is worse than oppression, tyranny, and extermination: ‘’Occupation’’

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My Name is Sarah, and I am Arab

February 16, 2011

My name is Sarah, I am a Moroccan girl, and I spent  a quarter of a century trying to prove to myself and to the others that I am not an Arab, that my country is different, that my culture is different, that my race is different, that my language is different, and that I am more European than Middle Eastern. Today I have these primitive tribal fervent feelings that I can’t explain whenever I see an Arab flag, here an Arabic song or see and young Arab demonstrating in a square. That’s why I would like to apologize and to admit that I was wrong about who I am.

The Resurrection of Arab Nationalism:

I was born in the 80s, the years of draught not only of rains, but a draught of democracy, a draught of ideology, a draught of economic prosperity and a draught of victories. We’ve grown up hearing our parents talk about the leftist ideals and how they liberated the country and our grandparents talk about World War II adventures. While us we are staring carelessly at the TV on the national team football march and hoping they will win because it is the only victory our generation can afford!

After 9/11 things got worse for us. Many youth abroad starting denying that they are Arabs and finding refuge in alternative or fake identities. Even at the state level there were a competition between the Arab countries to appear the least Arab possible and the more western possible to benefit from more foreign aid, and foreign support for the dictatorships in place.

The Jasmine revolution and more strongly the Egyptian Revolution were a slap on our faces. A slap that woke us up from the years of indoctrination and pro-western propaganda, and we realised that we don’t need them, that we are mature adult citizens who can run our interests without the tutorage of any extern power. So thank you for the technology, but keep your ideas for yourselves! Egypt made us taste the feeling of glory and pride far from football stadiums. It took revenge for our honour which we were prostituting for the West for the past 50 years. Egypt upgraded our status from third level slaves to first level free humans. While demonstrators were cleaning up Tahrir Square, they were sweeping up all the dirt from our Arab dignity and resurrecting Arab Nationalism

The Death of the Euromed

The Union for the Mediterranean and the Euromed are soiled unequal games we were forced to play because we didn’t have any other choice to situate ourselves geopolitically when the Arab League and the Maghreb Arab Union both failed. Today that we see other options, I would like to tell you Europe: sorry for the money you spent on us, but are not interested to play anymore!

If the Arab countries are able to withdraw or correct their corrupted regimes, if the young generations take the leadership, if we have the choice of our foreign policy, why would we chose to be part of an heterogeneous union that we didn’t plan or thought or dreamed, when we have the choice to have a Union with people with whom we have more affinities and understanding: the Arab Union. And from what I start to see, no Arab country will allow foreign interference to assist us anymore in the so called ‘’peaceful transition’’, because intercultural dialogue with the west is a luxury now and we have better to do dialoguing with our selves.

If the Arabs finally as a synthesis of their 20th century history can unite we can still be good friends and neighbours of the EU and the US but not as orphan fractions; as one strong body. Then the equilibrium in the cooperation we’ve been seeking will be met when we will negotiate Arab Union to European Union.

Change in the Emotional Map

Maybe I am getting to Emotional about it. Maybe I am wrong and these are only dreams! But what made these revolutions come true except from youth dreams? Even if nothing happens any soon in the political map, believe me a huge upheaval occurred in the Emotional Map of the Arab World and nothing can stop it from rising!

Now I can say proudly: My name is Sarah and I am Arab!

 

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Egypt, Yes there is a Conspiracy, but you Should be Pragmatic!

February 4, 2011

Oh Man! We Arabs we are big fans of conspiracy theories. It is our favourite collective therapy to find bizarre explanations to everything that happens to us from who ate the last piece of cheese to who is behind the turmoil in Egypt?

So let’s start! Let’s suppose that Israel and the Americans are behind all this and they are operating through Qatar their classical military ally, by giving orders to Al Jazeera to exaggerate the demonstrations and to indoctrinate the public opinion to get rid of our poor Baba Hosny Mubarak.

You know what? I believe there is a real conspiracy against Egypt by these highly strategic people.

The proof is that they keep on saying that they are censoring El Jazeera and persecuting their poor reporters, but al Jazeera never stopped broadcasting the images. Knowing Amni Edawla in Egypt, if they wanted really to kick them out they would had long time ago. Second fact, don’t you find strange that the call for demonstrations started by a Google executive, and that after censoring the net it is again Google who invented this Speak to Tweet thing in less than a second? Ok the truth is elsewhere as they say in X-files lol

Then we have other facts… the ones of Mr. Hasona being a pharaoh for 30 years now. That he is getting way older than the international norms and his friends from the NDP and his son way too powerful than what they should. We have a rising generation of youth, using amazingly internet technologies to mobilize the masses but who all agree being not satisfied of the current situation in their motherland. This rising middle class can make a real revolution that can turn extremely secular or extremely Islamite if uncle Hasony comes to have a heart attack tomorrow. So why someone like Israel, US or the masters of the universe will take such a risk? Thant’s why they Assisted you in your ‘’PEACEFUL TRANSITION’’ quoting Obama. In a way that they do a peaceful transition with the character they see fit for their interests: Uncle Suleiman, or Uncle Amr Musa or even 3amo Baradei.

Now that you know all this what should you do?

1. Hold on Mubarak and risk that when he will die the masters will not do a ‘’PEACEFUL TRANSITION’’ anymore and you will join the Iraq Club

2. Continue fighting like puppets and ending up with a more democratic president but with the same framework which don’t serve the interests of the Egyptian people.

3. Being pragmatic while dealing with this conspiracy and getting rid of Mooby, but asking for the maximum you can get and involving as much new elites in the conspiracy as you can have.

Personally, I support option number 3. If you cooperate now you can have a prosperity phase where you can prepare for a more genuine revolution within less than 5 years with a more mature political elite (thing that you lack now), that would have emerged from January 25th Youth. And the good news for everyone is that; we would all have taken revenge from the black days of the current regime and sacrifice another pharaoh from the dynasty.

Fellow Egyptians, remember : you must be pragmatic even with a conspiracy!

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A Picture of Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein

January 26, 2011

Black and White Picture:

When you were born in the late 70s and early 80s there was a black and white picture hang in the birth registration office. The picture represents a thin man with a military suite. That man’s name is n. He claims that he united the country, that he has beaten the enemy, that he will reform all the legislative and executive powers of the state, and that he is your hero.

Sepia Picture:

You start going to school and there is a sepia picture of Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein, but this time he is wearing a modern suite and Rayban glasses. He became friend with the so called ‘’enemy’’, he ‘’united’’ the country around values of corruption, dependency and fraud, he did many reforms at the legislative and executive powers of the state to allow his family member, military friends and foreign investors to dominate the politics and the economy, and to allow himself to remain in his golden chair for long time, and he is still claiming himself your ‘’hero’’.

Coloured Picture:

Things get hard for you, you live your first love stories and have the features of a real woman/man by now and you go to the university. In the conference hall there is a well situated picture of Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein. The picture is in colours, but he seems getting fat while the shopping purse of your family is getting small. Your former enemy is now called the potential investor and tourist, the country is very united except when there are ethnic, religious, ideological or tribal tensions, which happens more and more often. Reforms are doing ‘’great’’, the telecommunications, water, electricity, tobacco, gaz, cement, and even sewage and your wastes are privatized to foreign companies. You start looking in history, philosophy books, and Indian movies and even in football player for someone you can call a hero.

Photoshoped Picture:

Maturity is not easy to face when you have a miserable job which destroys your self esteem every day, when you start avoiding your girl friend’s questions because you have empty pockets and a heart full of dreams that will not satisfy you daily needs as a couple. You walk in the streets thinking about a solution, and on the corner there is a banner with a huge picture of Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein. The picture is photoshoped in order to reduce his belly and to give a lifting to his old face. You examine yourself with your hand, and you start thinking that you would use of some photoshop magical touches too. You receive a notification on your Gmail from your Facebook on your Blackberry about a demonstration. You change your Profile picture, push the Like button, update your status and send a message to your friends on BBM. After all, he is maybe a real hero. We are having a pretty good life! Why we always compare ourselves to other countries? We are a Special case!

Burned Picture:

You roll a join of hash or go to the mosque to reach a status of peace and forget that your girlfriend married an engineer in Kuwait, that your parents are getting old and tired, that Mody the son-in-law of the manager got the promotion you were dreaming of,. In the street there is a growing noise of young people like you shouting. You follow the voice and found a burned picture of Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein. The demonstrations are calling for real reforms for withdrawing the man in the picture and for some dignity for people like you and me. You belong to a generation that never thought revolutions really exist, that they are just old people’s tales, that you will live and die and leave Mohamed, Ahmed, Hosni, Hassan or Hussein as a heritage for your kids. Well, in the name of all this generation who has been digging and digging with our broken fingers, scratching and scratching with our weakened pens, kicking and kicking with our tired legs… now we can see some light at the end of the tunnel and the Hero who made it happen can be called YOU if you help us digging!